Pipelines

Blockage Remediation Part 2: Remediation Methodologies & Execution

Blockage remediation methods vary widely depending on the nature and location of the blockage, available facilities, targeted outcome(s) and costs involved. In Blockage Remediation Part 1: Blockage Characterization and Detection, we discussed the importance of correctly understanding the nature of a blockage in order to formulate an effective remediation solution.

This GATEKEEPER will focus on commonly applied remediation methodologies used in the industry, as well as discuss the GATE blockage remediation approach.

Bacterial Monitoring & Remediation in Pipelines

Bacteria inhabit the vast majority of oilfield water systems. These may either be attached to the pipe wall (i.e. sessile bacteria) or free floating through the system (i.e. planktonic bacteria). Planktonic bacteria do not directly contribute to the microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) of pipeline systems; however, planktonic bacteria can attach to the pipe wall under the right conditions, becoming sessile bacteria. Consequently, there is some value in monitoring planktonic bacteria activity in a pipeline, although it is substantially less beneficial than monitoring the sessile population activity.