Adam Darwin

SPE 125785 - Effect of THPS on Discharge Water Quality: A Lessons Learned Study

2010 Abstract, Karthik Annadorai, SPE; Adam Darwin, GATE, LLC

Biocides typically have an adverse impact on overboard water. THPS (tetrakishydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfate), one of the most commonly used biocides offshore has a similar effect on produced water. The effect of THPS on seawater used for hydrotesting and bulk storage is seldom studied and rarely documented. The effect of temperature, pH, water depth, dissolved oxygen concentration and various ions in the system is important to note. Once a certain volume of water is treated with any chemical, it is now deemed to be chemically treated seawater which cannot be discharged unless verified using the NOEC (No Observable Effect Concentration) testing method.

This experience will provide a detailed understanding of the discharge of chemically treated seawater as well as the interaction of THPS with potential ions in the matrix. Additionally, regular sampling and associated analyses will be presented that demonstrate the degradation and half-life of the THPS molecule in varying temperatures.

Periodic sampling of the THPS chemical in the seawater has provided a detailed understanding of the half-life degradation of the chemical. The interaction of the chemical with the cations present in the system and subsequent aversion to the neutralization reaction with hydrogen peroxide has also been studied and presented.

Source: SPE International Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production, 12-14 April 2010, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Copyright 2010. Society of Petroleum Engineers

NACE 10401 - Prevention Of Corrosion In Carbon Steel Pipelines Containing Hydrotest Water - An Overview

2010 Abstract, Adam Darwin, Karthik Annadorai, Gibson Applied Technology and Engineering, LLC; Krista Heidersbach, Chevron Energy Technology Center

A critical step in proving a pipeline is fit for operational use is the hydrostatic test, in which it is filled with water and pressurized to 125% of its Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure (MAOP). The water that is used in this testing can cause corrosion of the pipe, potentially leading to failure early in its operating life. Failures have occasionally been reported even before a pipeline enters service.

The most common mechanisms by which carbon steel pipelines may undergo corrosion on exposure to hydrotest water are Microbially Induced Corrosion (MIC), oxygen-related corrosion, galvanic corrosion and under-deposit corrosion. An overview of these mechanisms is presented, along with a discussion of the influence of different environmental factors on them. Factors considered include water source, degree of filtration, exposure period and temperature, air pockets, presence of internal pipe coatings and future pipeline service conditions.

Maintaining the risk of pipe corrosion from hydrotest water within acceptable limits is discussed. Factors considered are:

How long the untreated water may be allowed to be present in the pipeline.

Should water treatment be required, what must be used?

Disposal requirements for the treated water, including chemical treatments.

Source: CORROSION 2010, March 14 - 18, 2010 , San Antonio, TX

Copyright 2010. NACE International